Category Archives: Environment

Raw Nature

Two very different novels that pit humans against the forces of nature.

FerencikThe first is a rather melodramatic adventure story.  Four women, who have been friends “forever”; led by Pia, they embark on a wild river adventure into the wilderness of Maine. Pia is always the leader on these occasions and on this one she has excelled herself. So, in spite of misgivings on the part of the other three, they set off to meet their guide.

The first meeting is not encouraging, but now they are committed.  So the next morning they pile into the off road vehicle to get to the river. The road, which the guide, Rory, finds astonishingly muddy after two weeks of rain proves challenging enough, but then there is a long hike through difficult terrain to the first camp site…

The group fragment somewhat before they have even hit the river, as for the first night in their tents, three of the women are subjected to the full opera of a sexual fling between the fourth women and Rory. So sizzling with a mixture of contempt and envy the first full day starts rather badly, not least because racoons have got into some of the provisions…

It gets worse and instead of being about sniping at each other, it becomes a trial of strength as to which of them will survive. Think The River Wild, a film in which Meryl Streep takes on a white water adventure with two escaped convicted murderers & extract the convicts.

Did no one realise that a river swollen by two weeks of rain might be dangerous?

Erica Ferencik is a screenwriter and novelist based in Massachusetts.

TreloarThe second novel is set in South Australia, always my beloved country.  It flips between Hester Crane, neé Finch, now living in Chichester, England in the 1860s and her memories of a hard and difficult life on Salt Creek some ten years earlier. The Finch family take up a lot on The Coorong, a lagoon some distance from Adelaide on the southern coast. Led by their father from the settled life in an almost civilised city, they arrive to find a shack built from old ships’ planking, branches and mud daub.

The facts are slowly revealed, the patriarchal Finch is a loser, gambling on making money from one scheme after another, he has failed and this is the last ditch attempt to regain everything.

So Mama, four boys and two girls are towed along in his wake. His rectitude or hypocrisy knows no bounds and extend outwards towards the Aboriginal families that live on the land already. He aims to civilise them…

The family he meets and mixes with include a young man who they name Tull, although not specifically clear, it can be assumed that Tull or Tully is a half caste. As with all interventions and relationships between the white settlers and the original dwellers there is the inevitable conflicts, including: disease, depredation of the land and the watering holes. But Tull, who speaks English already, and his mother, Rimmilli, who also speaks English, are different and Tull gradually joins the Finch family, learns to read and flourishes.

There are some lovely passages in this book, beautiful descriptions of the land and the light but the story itself is a harsh and unforgiving look at parental control and downright cruelty. The Finches perch on the land, taking from it in ways that are incomprehensible to Tull and to his family, and he wavers between the two different cultures. We do not see his life with his natural family, but only learn that he often goes away for several months.

Meanwhile, other relationships are few and far between and of those that exist in such an unpopulated area, some are of more consequence than others…

This is Lucy Treloar‘s first novel, though she is already well known for award winning collections of short stories.

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Christmas shopping anyone? Look no further…

ScanThere is one present suitable for all ages, not too expensive, inexpressibly beautiful and an joy forever – a book, but not just any book. The Lost Words by Robert MacFarlane and illustrated by Jackie Morris.

A while back I posted about Robert MacFarlane’s book Landmarks, [May 9 2013] and commented on one of the saddest paragraphs I had ever read. He was writing about words that were being dropped from The Oxford Junior Dictionary. Space obligations were creating a demand for some words to be left out in order to make way for new words that children would need to know and MacFarlane listed some of them: adder, willow, ivy, fern, wren…

and so on. But now he has rectified this terrible omission by creating an alternative, an illustrated book of these lost words.

Each word used and illustrated comes out in stages: the opener is a beautiful picture threaded with letters, but the observant reader will spot that some letters are a different colour and spell out a word; turn the page and there is the word and a “spell”, a short or long semi-poetic evocation of the meaning by MacFarlane and on the next full page and double spread – an exquisite painting of the subject/object by Jackie Morris.

Only picking up this book and looking through it can you even begin to capture its essence and its joy. But if you are wondering what to give a partner, a godchild, a grandparent, a parent, a difficult aunt and above all – any child you know…you will have in your hands the answer.

backcover

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61st London Film Festival – Day 6

Guardians

I went in to this screening without reading up my notes, so I had forgotten that I chose this on account of the director, Xavier Beauvois. The Guardians comes from the same place in the heart as his previous film Of Gods and Men (LFF 2010). In the former film, it was the monks who were taken hostage.  In this film it is the women: farmers’ wives, daughters and cousins, left with only the old men while their young men fight in the First World War, it is they who are hostage to the exigencies of farm life in an age when farming was manual labour.

Early scenes show Hortense, a woman of around seventy (at a guess) labouring across a field ploughing with a horse, sometimes even with oxen. It is hard work, men’s work but these women must keep it going or starve.

The film concentrates on a single farm run by Hortense, the matriarch. It becomes apparent that she has two sons at the front and a son-in-law, Clovis. His wife works on the farm with her mother, but eventually they need more help, which arrives in the form of Francine, an orphan – therefore protected by the State until she becomes 21 – but who is an excellent worker, durable and honest.

The casting is magnificent: Nathalie Baye plays Hortense, and her real-life daughter, Laura Smet plays her daughter, Solange. But the newcomer Iris Bry, who plays Francine, shines out like a torch. Her subtlety of movement, facial expression and air of dogged goodness makes her story in this profound meditation on hardship and grit and grief all the more telling. Very many of the rest of the cast are non-professionals. Hortense’s husband is played by Gilbert Bonneau, who makes his film debut at 78.

The cinematography is exquisite, with slow panning views across the farm at different seasons; the farm itself is lovely, gorgeously rural, well-set stone dwellings, with dark, cramped interiors. But for all that, somehow very compelling because it meant that many of the interior scenes were close up to the actors, so every lip tremble and tear was right there.

I have no idea where this was filmed, but I suspect not in France. But wherever it was – I want to go there.

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Man Booker Longlist 2017 – 12

It is very hard to know what to say about Elmet, the debut novel by UK author Fiona Mozley. It is a most remarkable beginning. Set at an undisclosed time, in a Yorkshire setting (Elmet was a Celtic Kingdom, largely spread over Yorkshire) a small family, father and two children make a hardy living in a house built for them by the father..Elmet

They are not travellers, though they have had contact with them; they are not exactly local, though the mother came from this area; they are not socially adept and now do not attend school; they live as much as possible off the land, trapping, foraging and making do.

In a very different way from the family in the other debut novel, Daniel and Cathy, his sister, are living outside society. John, the father has been a prize fighter, but not in the ring. This is illegal, bare-knuckle fighting where prize money comes from betting, and John is in a class apart, the strongest unbeaten fighter in England and Ireland. But during the period which is covered by this narrative, he has in fact given up fighting, though he often goes away leaving the two children to fend for themselves.

The book opens with the consequences of what happens at the end of the novel, and this only becomes apparent slowly. Sections in italics are in the first person narrative of the boy, Daniel. Why he is on his own does not get revealed until the end.

As Daniel travels, he fills in the bigger picture with a description of the events and personalities that led up to the end event.

There is a brooding threat hanging over the story, a supressed violence, which from the start seems to suggest that all is not going to end well. The graphic descriptions of the conditions that this family are living in are powerfully executed, and you really do get a sense of the social dislocation of this family.

On the whole, John is clearly a kind and well intentioned man, he helps out with things that people need doing, picks up odd jobs and has proved capable of building a sizeable and decent house for the family from next to nothing. But they are not safe, and their home life comes under threat from one principle quarter. John has a radical solution and calls in several like-minded people to start a community action which goes well to start with.

But it is in the nature of such things, there will come a backlash and once it comes things speedily change…

The writing is descriptive, moody and tight. There is neither a word too many, nor a word too few. In spare but lucid prose we are given a very clear picture of the situation and the denouement is shockingly violent.

This is very much the sort of book one would hope to find on the shortlist

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A break from the Booker

Had a long train journey and baulked at the idea of carrying a kilo+ book in my handbag, so left Paul Auster behind.  I went into WH Smith at the station and laid my hand on the nearest paperback that looked halfway interesting.

stefThis turned out to be Stef Penney‘s third novel, Under a Pole Star. It was an absolute find! It is quite a wonder that this writer has actually never been to any of the places that she writes so evocatively about, she is a self-confessed “armchair traveller”, so that all her background writing on locale, weather, snow conditions and such like come from research rather than experience.

This novel covers early exploration and scientific study in and around the Arctic Circle. The central character in Under a Pole Star is once again a strong and formidable woman, she is the daughter of an English whaler, a widower who perforce took his young daughter, Flora, with him on his two year forays into the Northern waters after whales. Here she mixed with men and with Inuits in a frozen waste and loved it. At some point, Captain Mackie realises that she can no longer accompany him, leaving her with a yearning ambition to return.

The story starts with an elderly woman waiting, weather-bound, in Gander airport to be flown to the North Pole for a PR stunt that she does not fully understand. Along with the group is a young journalist called Randall Crane. He has an ulterior motive which is revealed later, but his questions cause her memory to break open…

This is both a love story and a wonderful tale of explorers and scientists from America and Britain competing to study and, indeed, exploit the frozen North. It is a tale of delight and betrayal, danger and survival, professional shenanigans and competition and a deep love of the frozen Arctic.

The descriptive passages bring to mind the writings of Cherry Garrard in The Worst Journey in the World, which the author says she has included in her research, but it is not the worst for that. The difficulties that these early explorers endured are the stuff of legends, and even if this book is entirely fictional it brings these horrors and demands very much to life.

I was as gripped by this book as much as by The Tenderness of Wolves which I also loved. [What is it with Wolves? April 10, 2017]

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Man Booker Longlist 2017 – 9

I think that while authors like Mike McCormack are still writing it is safe to say that the novel is not dead. That said, Solar Bones, his latest title is quite some read.

Solar BonesFirst of all, the book has no dust jacket, and seen in a pile from the angle of the cut page, it could be mistaken for a prayer book, as the pages are gilded. Then on opening the book, the reader becomes quickly aware that there are no full-stops, not just on page one but throughout the whole book even to the end.

So with no stops and no chapters and virtually no breaks in the prose, except for spacings, what exactly is this? A train of thought or stream-of-consciousness? Is it spooling backwards even though we are reading it forwards?page

The big question though is what is the relationship between the situation we find on page one to the events we experience in the last seven and a half pages. Is there a caesura somewhere that brings us into the present, and if so where?

These questions are important, but not killing. This is an extraordinarily rich, complex and wide reaching river of words describing the marriage and family life of one, Marcus Conway, civil engineer and father to Agnes and Darragh, husband to Mairead; the thoughts and ramblings of this one man, Marcus from the ringing of the Angelus bell at midday on 2nd November, to the pips signalling the one o’clock news on 21st March. That is to say, the thoughts range over this man’s childhood, various national events and some personal ones that eventually converge in the sickness of Mairead who is a victim of a Clostridium poisoning which takes down over six hundred inhabitants, and probably more, in an un-named Irish city, when the water supply is contaminated with human waste.

Meanwhile, we come back again and again to this same kitchen table with Marcus sitting at it, thinking and feeling a slow, unidentified dread.

The novel is full of humour, Darragh is quite the joker although we only meet him on Skype as he is currently the other side of the world; Marcus himself is not without a sense of the absurd, but also a sense of his own worth, which comes out in one train of thought about some work he is meant to be signing off, and cannot because the work is sub-standard: his civil duty and a quiet life for the politicos involved being at odds with one another.

I have never come across a novel quite like this one. It is not, even by a stretch of imagination comparable to Ulysses, Leopold Bloom’s experiences cover a single day and 260,000 words but it is clever and challenging in exactly the same way, and leaves you thinking about it for hours after.

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Man Booker Longlist 2017 – 6

Zadie Smith, you love her or you don’t. This is what I have found among readers that I talk to. Sadly, I am among those who don’t really care for her books and I feel it is only fair to come right out with this straightaway.

Swing TimeSpring Time is a novel about two girls, the narrator and Tracey. The two girls meet with their mothers in a cemetery, of all places. Their lives are inextricably linked from there on. Tracey and the narrator go to a dance class with Miss Isabel, piano played by Mr Booth. Tracey is a natural, the narrator has flat feet and only a limited sense of rhythm. The competition begins right there.

Tracey lives with her enormous mother and no obvious other parent; the narrator lives with both her parents, white father who is unambitious, conscientious and caring (apparently) and her mother is a Jamaican, resolute, selfish, ambitious and driven.

The area is North London, more or less. Don’t use this novel as an A-Z!

The lives of the two girls, all narrated in the first person, go from that first meeting through teenage and into adulthood, the predictable paths of these two and their parents looks set to play out according to script, but then this is a novel and it is by Zadie Smith.

I do think this is likely to be on the shortlist. It is clever, surprising and wilful. Will I be ecstatic if it wins? No. But I do admire Zadie Smith for mining a rich source of material from her locality and her people (not necessarily those related to her, as per Sebastian Barry, but those close by). I had a friend who was the priest at St Mary’s Willesden, and these people were in his congregation, everyone one of them.

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